​​​JOURNALING Question Prompt:


Write out one or more of the following questions in your Family Theme Day Scrapbook or on a piece of paper to glue in your scrapbook: 

hat is your favourite book to read?  What book do you like hearing read out loud to you? What do you like to write about?  What type of stories do you like? What new book would you like to read?

THEMED BOOKS: Find books at the library or on you bookshelf that inspire your children.  Themes could include seasons of the year, holidays, or just topics your chidlren enjoy (like dinosaurs or magic).

How to encourage your child to write:

Choose the level of your child:
Toddler/Preschool – discuss the answer(s) out loud first and have your child draw a picture of the answer

Preschool/Kindergarten – discuss the answer(s) out loud first and write the answer down for him/her leaving one word for him/her to write out himself/herself with your help. You could also encourage him/her to draw a picture as well.

Early Grade School – have your child either write out the answer himself/herself (encourage phonetic spelling) without your help, or offer to help with spelling each word out loud one word at a time.


Grade School – have your child write a sentence or two on his/her own and then read over and discuss the response.  (You decide whether to correct the spelling or not)

Older Child – have your child write a longer response (paragraph).

As A Challenge – instead of a question ask your older child to write a story or poem about going to the library, or meeting their favourite book character.

Sorry this photo is missing as our library is temporarily closed

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WRITING AND READING

Family Literacy Day

Here are some picture books about going to the library:

The Best Book to Read, by Debbie Bertram & Susan Bloom and illustrated by Michael Garland, Random house, 2008—With rhyming text this story tells of a class who visits the library and are introduced to numerous types of books (space, insects, dinosaurs etc.) so they can find the best book to read for themselves.

Book! Book! Book!
, by Deborah Bruss and illustrated by Tiphanie Beeke, Arthur A. Levine Books, 2001—When the farm animals are bored they go to the library but unfortunately the librarian cannot understand them...until the chicken gives it a try.

The Boy Who Was Raised by Librarians, by Carla Morris and illustrated by Brad Sneed, Peachtree , 2007—Three friendly librarians help a boy, Melvin, learn throughout his childhood.

The Ghost Library, by David Mellings, Barron’s, 2004—A little girl named Bo is whisked away one evening to the empty ghost library when two ghosts try to steal her book.

Library Lion, by Michelle Knudsen and illustrated by Kevin Hawkes, Candlewick Press, 2006—This is a cute tale of a lion who wanders in a library and befriends and helps the librarian Mrs. Merriweather. 

Read It, Don’t Eat it!, by Ian Schoenherr, Greenwillow Books, 2009 – This rhyming book with simple yet fun animal illustrations tells you what to do and not to do with a library book.

COMIC BOOKS: If you have a reluctant reader in your family, why not try comic books?

More Reading Ideas:

For this Theme Day look on your child's bookshelves together and take down some family favourites!


You could also plan a trip to the library to find some new books to read together.

What children's book authors does your family like? We've always been big Dr. Seuss Fans!

For something different try a riddle book:

ABC Nature Riddles, by Susan Joyce and illustrated by Doug DuBosque, Peel Productions, Inc, 2000 – Using poems and fill in the blanks, each page offers a riddle for the reader to guess what part of nature is being described.

Find books about going to the library for this Theme Day at  your local library!