Try to find some of these Non-fiction learning titles:


Animal Abilities: Bats, by Charlotte Guillan, Raintree, A good non-fiction book for grade schoolers to learn about bats.


Bats, by Kari Schuetz, bellwether Media, 2012 - Park fo the Backyard wildlife series this is for new readers as it offers very large text.


Bats: Biggest! Littllest!, by Sandra Markle, Boyds Mill Press, 2013 - Easy to read and full of lots of facts and great photographs.


The Bat's Cave: A Dark City, by Joyce Markovics, Bearport, 2010 - for those wanting to learn more about the home of the bat: the cave!


Bats in the Dark, by Doreen Gonzales, PowerKids Press, 2010 - Part of the "Creatures of the Night Series" this offers a lot of information with large text for eager new readers.


Bats! Strange and Wonderful, by Laurence Pringle and illustrated by Meryl Henderson, Boyds Mills Press, 2000 - This looks like a picture book with its watercolour illustrations but is a thorough overview of bats.


The Case of the Vanishing Little Brown Bats: A Scientific Mystery, by Sandra Markle, Millbrooke Press, 2015 - Follow a team of scientists working to save the little brown bats.


 Endangered Bats, by Bobbie Kalman & Kristina Lundblad, Crabtree Publishing Company, 2006 – A thorough but easy to read book about bats that includes ways to save the bats.


It's A Good Thing There Are Bats, by Joanne Mattern, Scholastic, 2015 - Another good book for new readers.


Let's Look at Bats, by Ruth Berman, Lerner Publications Company, 2010 - using big text a large pictures this is a good book for new readers.


Flying Fox Bats, by Tamara  L. Britton, ABDO Publishing Company, 2011 - For those looking to learn abotu indiciual types of bats this series provides easy to read information (other titles include: Dog-Faced Bats, Vampire Bats, Fisherman Bats, Spear-nosed Bats, and Wrinkle-Faced Bats).


National Geographic Readers: Bats, by Elizabeth Carney, National Geographic, 2010 – This easy reader offers a good overview of bat facts and has some great photographs.


A Place For Bats, written by Melissa Stewart and illustrated by Higgins Bond, Peachtree, 2017 - learn about bats all around North America with this beautifully illustrated book.



WRITING

Go to your local library together as a family and find books about bats!

Copyright 2018. Family Theme Days. All rights reserved.

Try to find some picture books featuring bats as well:


Bats at the Beach, written and illustrated by Brian Lies, Houghton Mifflin Company, 2006 – This rhyming picture book offers fun illustrations and a cute story of bats frolicking at the beach.    Brian Lies has two other similar bat stories: Bats at the Library and Bats at the Ballgame.


Big Brown Bat, by Rick Chrustowski, Henry Holt and Company, 2008 - Follow a bat pup on his journey of growth.


Good Night, Bat! Good Morning, Squirrel!, by Paul Meisel, Boyds Mill Press, 2016 - Can daytime and nighttime animals ever become friends?


I Am Bat, by Morag Hood, Two Hoots, 2017 - Bat loves cherries, what happens when they go missing?


Lost Little Bat, by Sandra Markle and illustrated by Alan Marks, Charlesbridge, 2006 - With beautiful watercolour illustrations this book tells a tale of sorrow and hope for one litlte lost bat.


Morris...the Downside-Up Bat, Written and illustrated by H.R. Karpes, Sky Pony press, 2013 - Will the other bats learn to accept Morris for being different?



Reading & Writing

JOURNALING QUESTION PROMPT:

Write out one or more of the following questions in your Family Theme Day Scrapbook or on a piece of paper to glue in your scrapbook:  


What do you know about bats? Where do bats live? How many different types of bats can you name?  What would you like to learn about bats? What is the most interesting thing you learned about bats while having this Theme Day?

BOOKS

Bats

How to encourage your child to write:

Choose the level of your child:
Toddler/Preschool – discuss the answer(s) out loud first and have your child draw a picture of the answer.

Preschool/Kindergarten – discuss the answer(s) out loud first and write the answer down for him/her leaving one word for him/her to write out himself/herself with your help. You could also encourage him/her to draw a picture as well.

Early Grade School – have your child either write out the answer himself/herself (encourage phonetic spelling) without your help, or offer to help with spelling each word out loud one word at a time.

Grade School – have your child write a sentence or two on his/her own and then read over and discuss the response.  (You decide whether to correct the spelling or not)

Older Child – have your child write a longer response (paragraph).

As A Challenge – instead of a question ask your older child to write a story or poem about bats.